Scouting For Food Unit Collection Tips

Follow these guidelines to help your unit have a successful scouting for Food collection:
1. Your unit should work within its predetermined area to avoid overlap.
2. On boundary streets, collect on your side of the street only (unless given other instructions).
3. Skip apartment units with controlled access and "No Solicitation" rules (unless previous arrangements have been made).
4. Do not solicit from grocery stores or other commercial establishments (unless previous arrangements have been made).
5. Collection bags, with instructions to the householder, should be distributed door-to-door on Bag Distribution Day beginning at 9 a.m. on March 8th.
6. When distributing bags, place them in or on the door. Do not put them in mailboxes. It is unlawful to do so. If you can, place them over the doorknob that is ideal.
7. Food must be collected before submitting the data information to the Scouting for Food Chairman: Mrs. Maria Bippes from the same area where you distributed your bags.
8. Food should be turned in to your local pantry (email your location to your District Chairman.
9. Collection Location is a great way to get your count verified and many have a weigh-in station.                                                                                                                                 ◦        - When collecting donations on Bag Collection Day, if nothing is on the doorstep or porch, ask your boys to knock on the door to see if the householder has a donation.
◦Make a follow-up "run-through" in your area in the afternoon to pick up late donations.
◦Be certain boys are in full uniform, travel in groups of two or more and are adequately supervised. This is especially true for Cub Scouts.
◦If you have any questions, call your district Scouting For Food headquarters.

The River Trails District, Rolla Boy Scout Service Center, and Scouting for Food headquarters for the month of March and . The phone number is 573-364-1504; but if you have any questions please do not hestiate to contact your District Scouting for Food Chairman bippesfamily@gmail.com.

The Perfect Scouting for Food Bag

The products depicted are representations only and are not intended to indicate sponsorship or endorsement by the product manufacturers.

 Question: With so many canned food options on the store shelves, how do I know what items are best to donate to food drives such as Scouting for Food?

Answer: After consulting with numerous food pantry directors in the area and seeking nutrition advice from Roberta Larson Duyff, a local registered dietitian and author of the American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, 4th edition 2012, we compiled what we like to call the Perfect Bag. The Perfect Bag contains variety of nutrient-rich foods from all five food groups.

With so many canned food options on the store shelves, how do I know what items are best to donate to food drives such as Scouting for Food? After consulting with numerous food pantry directors in the area and seeking nutrition advice from , a local registered dietitian and author of the , 4th edition 2012, we compiled what we like to call the . The Perfect Bag contains variety of nutrient-rich foods from all five food groups.

2 cans of hearty soup, stew or chili: Supplies many nutrients.

2 cans of tuna, chicken, turkey, salmon or luncheon meat (e.g., Spam): Contains protein and iron. Canned salmon is a source of calcium and omega-3 fatty acids.

1 can of fruit: Supplies vitamins A and C, foliate, potassium, fiber and other healthy substances.

1 can of 100 percent pure fruit or vegetable juice: Contains vitamin C and often beta carotene.

1 can of vegetables: Supplies beta carotene, vitamin C, foliate, complex carbohydrates, fiber and potassium.

1 can of tomato or pasta sauce: Contains vitamins A and C, as well as lycopene, a healthy substance that is more available to your body in canned and cooked tomatoes than in fresh.

1 canned meal: Offers a variety of ingredients and nutrients.

1 can of beans, refried beans or lentils: Contains plenty of protein, complex carbohydrates and fiber.

1 can of evaporated milk: Makes an excellent source of calcium and protein

 

Scouting For Food Fact Sheet

The River Trails District, which includes 7 counties in eastern central Missouri, started Scouting for Food in the 1980's. Since then, the campaign has grown into the Boy Scouts of America's largest single-month community food drive. Over the years, the campaign has collected 47 million food donations.

It takes a great deal of community support, planning, cooperation, desire, dedication, passion and volunteers to make Scouting for Food the largest single community food drive in the BSA. Here's a look at what Scouting for Food is, how it works and what's new.

What Is Scouting for Food? Scouting for Food is usually a week-long food drive that starts and ends on consecutive Saturdays. This year, the drive will start on Saturday, March 8th, (Bag Distribution Day), and end Saturday, March 15th; (Bag Collection Day). Note: These are suggested dates as the Ozark Trails Council now does the whole month of March for ease for unit coordination.

Scouting for Food is usually a week-long food drive that starts and ends on consecutive Saturdays. This year, the drive will start on Saturday, March 8th, (Bag Distribution Day), and end Saturday, March 15th; (Bag Collection Day). Note: These are suggested dates as the Ozark Trails Council now does the whole month of March for ease for unit coordination.

Bag Delivery - On March 8th, Scouts in all 7 counties of the River Trails District will deliver plastic bags to residences all over the River Trails District of southeastern Missouri. During the week, community residents will "thoughtfully give," filling their bags with nutritious canned goods.

Bag Collection - On March 15th, the Scouts will retrieve the filled bags from residents and take them to local participating businesses, and where volunteers will take there food goods to there designated local pantry.

Ingredients for Success: Through "thoughtful giving," Scouting for Food strives to deliver more than 12000 cans of food to nearly 110 food pantries that gain more than three months of provisions. Here's the program by numbers...

1,000 Scouts (45 Scout units) 1,200 Volunteers (Scout leaders and families) 2,400 bags handed out 7 local counties 1 Rolla Service Center

Partners: Gathering, sorting, packaging and transporting more than fifteen thousand cans of food requires a coalition of organizations. This year's partners include the following:

Beneficiaries:

Local food banks within Phelps, Pulaski, Dent, Texas, Miller, Maries, and Camden,  Local area food banks distributes more than 4.5 million pounds of food annually to more than 130 food pantries within the District area, ranging from the Salvation Army to small church food pantries. The food bank will distribute the Scouting for Food donations to there local food distribution center.